SRT1720: Good (And Confusing) News for Obese Mice

An insider analysis of a new Nature Scientific Reports paper by Derek Lowe:

Readers of this blog will be fairly familiar with the long, interesting story of sirtuin activators. Today we will speak of SRT1720, of which we have spoken before. This molecule was described in 2007 as an activator of Sirt1 with beneficial effects in rodent models of diabetes. But both of those statements were called into question by a series of papers which found difficulties with both the in vitro and the in vivo results (summarized here). The GSK/Sirtris team fired back, but that paper also served as a white flag on the in vitro assay questions: there were indeed artifacts due to the fluorescent peptides used. (Another paper has since confirmed these problems and proposed an off-target mechanism).

But that GSK response didn’t address the in vivo assay questions at all – we still had a situation where one group said that these compounds (SRT1720 in particular) were beneficial, and another said that it showed no benefit and was toxic at higher doses. Adding to the controversy, another paper appeared late last year that went back to nematodes, and found the SRT1720 did not extend their lives, either. The state of this field can be fairly described, then, as “extremely confused”.

Now we have a new paper whose title gets right down to it: “SRT1720 improves survival and healthspan of obese mice”. First time I’ve seen “healthspan” as a word, I might add, and another interesting sidelight is that this appears in Nature Scientific Reports, the publishing group’s open-access experiment. But now to the data:

{snip all the meat}

[From SRT1720: Good (And Confusing) News for Obese Mice]