Which nations have the best ‘melting pot’?

Richard Florida summarizes the recent research for Atlantic Business:

(…) The Migration Integration Policy Index (MIPEX) rates the EU nations’ (plus Norway, Switzerland, Canada, and the U.S. — 31 countries in all) efforts to integrate immigrants according to 148 policy indicators, which range from opportunities for education and political participation to levels of protection against discrimination, from prospects for reuniting with family to the likelihood of achieving permanent residence status and citizenship.

For those keeping score, Sweden ranked first, Portugal second, and Canada third. The U.S. was ninth! The map below shows the scores for the 31 countries measured by the Index.

(…)  The MIPEX measures something different and deeper — the degree to which nations successfully integrate and proactively include immigrants.

Read the whole thing »

My personal perspective on the economics is crisply summarized in this paragraph

It’s about more than generosity and big-heartedness. Immigrants are, in fact, key to economic growth and development, especially in our high-tech industries. Immigrants “have started 52% of Silicon Valley’s technology companies and contributed to more than 25% of our global patents, according toVivek Wadhwa, who has extensively studied the subject. “They make up 24% of the U.S. science and engineering workforce holding bachelor’s degrees and 47% of science and engineering workers who have Ph.Ds.” This is what venture capitalist John Doerr was talking about when he told an interviewer at the Web 2.0 Summit that America should “staple a green card to the diploma” of any immigrant who gets a degree in engineering.