A Really Good Article on How Easy it Is to Crack Passwords

Pretty much anything that can be remembered can be cracked

Bruce Schneier discusses how the increasing Power and Efficiency off password cracking makes careless users increasingly vulnerable.

…The article goes on to explain how dictionary attacks work, how well they do, and the sorts of passwords they find.

Steube was able to crack “momof3g8kids” because he had “momof3g” in his 111 million dict and “8kids” in a smaller dict.

“The combinator attack got it! It's cool,” he said. Then referring to the oft-cited xkcd comic, he added: “This is an answer to the batteryhorsestaple thing.”

What was remarkable about all three cracking sessions were the types of plains that got revealed. They included passcodes such as “k1araj0hns0n,” “Sh1a-labe0uf,” “Apr!l221973,” “Qbesancon321,” “DG091101%,” “@Yourmom69,” “ilovetofunot,” “windermere2313,” “tmdmmj17,” and “BandGeek2014.” Also included in the list: “all of the lights” (yes, spaces are allowed on many sites), “i hate hackers,” “allineedislove,” “ilovemySister31,” “iloveyousomuch,” “Philippians4:13,” “Philippians4:6-7,” and “qeadzcwrsfxv1331.” “gonefishing1125” was another password Steube saw appear on his computer screen. Seconds after it was cracked, he noted, “You won't ever find it using brute force.”

So get yourself a secure password manager. As I write 1Password is still on half-price sale! And here is the referenced Ars Technica article: Anatomy of a hack: How crackers ransack passwords like “qeadzcwrsfxv1331” For Ars, three crackers have at 16,000+ hashed passcodes—with 90 percent success.