Do wild animals avoid GMO corn? Join the experiment!

This is exciting – a group of serious scientists have launched a crowd-sourced experiment to test the hypothesis that wild animals such as squirrels and deer prefer non-GMO corn, and avoid GMO corn. It's exciting because you can participate – it's easy.

Anecdotal reports suggest that animals avoid eating genetically engineered or GMO corn when given a choice, while others suggest that animals have no preference. With the right materials, this is an easy experiment to do, but there are no peer-reviewed, published scientific studies to answer this question – yet.

In this experiment, we will send ears of GMO and non-GMO corn to volunteers. Adults and children, individuals and classrooms can be part of the first Citizen Science experiment to test claims about GMOs. Everyone’s results will be combined in a peer-reviewed scientific journal article

I just listened to the Talking Biotech podcast #20 on the corn experiment. Kevin Folta and – Karl Haro von Mogel do a deep dive into the design of the experiment. If you donate $25 or more at Experiment.com you will receive your own kit. And you can put your school on the waiting list for a free experiment.

Donate, contribute a bit of your time and you can be part of a real science project. You will learn how an experiment like this has to be designed so that the results will survive peer-review. And if the hypothesis is supported by the data I think the resulting peer-reviewed paper might make the cover of Science! All the supporters will be listed as contributors in the paper.

 

4 thoughts on “Do wild animals avoid GMO corn? Join the experiment!

  1. My boys and I can’t wait to do this. We have some interesting animals and disgusting insects in Florida so I’m a little nervous about what I’ll wake up to. It’s fun to be able to participate.

  2. That experiment is an excellent idea. One would think that if animals favored non-GMO corn the GMO-science deniers would already have proof to back up their claims.

    The nature of that experiment is such that manipulation could invalidate the results. Even without manipulation extreme care would be required to ensure valid results. Even slight differences in soil composition could make a difference.

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